Does the formula for the perfect ad or commercial exist?

Dalibor Šumiga Behavioral marketing/Neuromarketing, Marketing

measuring emotions, neuromarketing, impressions, behavioral marketing, digital marketing

The answer is – YES….

Here’s the formula for the perfect ad:

Functional benefit + emotional twist = perfect advertisement

Let me show you a few examples of how this formula works – on a TV commercial, on a billboard, on a print ad….

TV AD

Do you remember the Volkswagen commercial for the new Passat? If you haven’t seen it, check out the ad below:


Functional benefit: The new Passat can be unlocked remotely.

Emotional twist: Mini Darth Vader (thinks he’s) unlocking the Passat by using “The Force”.

BILLBOARD AD

Metservice.com has posted a billboard in New Zealand to promote its weather forecast page.

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Functional benefit: The most accurate weather forecast.

Emotional twist: The billboard is hollow so that only the sky can be seen inside the frame, showing the most accurate weather forecast…

PRINT AD

After the news spread around the world of show business that Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt had split up, Norwegian Airlines published this print ad:

measuring emotions, neuromarketing, impressions, behavioral marketing, digital marketing

Functional benefit: Cheap one-way plane tickets to Los Angeles.

Emotional twist: You can travel cheaply to L.A. (where Brad Pitt lives) and become the new love of his life.

HOW WILL YOU KNOW IF YOUR ADVERTISEMENT HAS THE MAGIC FORMULA?

The strongest ads have a very pronounced emotional component. The best way to find out if your ad has the magic formula is by neuromarketing measurement.

The most reliable method uses 2 sensors:

01) EEG – measurement of subconscious motivation by analysis of electrical impulses of the brain

Motivation can be positive or negative (so-called emotional valence)

02) GSR – measurement of excitement using sweat microparticles

This sensor is binary – there is excitement or no excitement; to find out if arousal is positive or negative we use emotional valence (EEG).

This is what the measurement setting looks like:

measuring emotions, neuromarketing, impressions, behavioral marketing, digital marketing

The measurement results are presented through the so-called. Circumplex model. The vertical axis shows the level of arousal, and the horizontal the subconscious emotional reaction (positive or negative).

measuring emotions, neuromarketing, impressions, behavioral marketing, digital marketing

The ideal scenario is for your ad to be in the upper right sector.

If you are testing perfumes, for example, you may want to be in the lower right sector, you want your perfume to provoke a calming reaction.

By no means do you want to be in the left sectors. There is a theory that advertisements that deal with social issues should be in the left sectors. That they should cause fear and shock among the audience, but most research has shown that this strategy is not good. The best examples are the shocking stickers on cigarette boxes; neuromarketing research has shown that they provoke the opposite reaction – the target group has a greater desire to light a cigarette.

DOES IT MAKE SENSE TO TEST AN ADVERTISING THAT’S ALREADY FINISHED?

Absolutely.

Keep in mind that you can also conduct neuromarketing testing on storyboards or animatics. Of course, it’s not the same as when you’re testing a finished ad, but you can check what emotional reaction key scenes / messages elicit in the early stages of creation.

measuring emotions, neuromarketing, impressions, behavioral marketing, digital marketing

If you already have a ready-made advertisement, on which you will spend tens of thousands of euros and tens more on media buying, wouldn’t it be good to know in advance whether the advertisement will provoke a good or bad reaction?

If the research shows that the ad doesn’t provoke a very positive reaction, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t show the ad. You just need to increase the frequency of display because more exposure will be needed for the ad to be noticed by customers.

Most of the ads we test aren’t bad, in fact, you’ll rarely see a disastrous ad. Most of them are very similar and don’t automatically provoke a very strong positive reaction from the audience.

But each of them also has its own extremely bright moments. If you test a finished advertisement, you can find out which elements of the advertisement evoke the strongest emotion and use them, for example, in digital.

I will show you what I am talking about in a very nice anecdote….

My friend Domagoj, who participated in quite a few neuromarketing tests, asked me to try and guess his personal preferences based on the results of his tests.

Although I don’t like “to tell fortunes” from neuromarketing research, I fulfilled his wish. The accuracy of the estimates was approximately 99%.

I will single out 2 examples:

The commercial for Čokolino that Domagoj watched showed us that he’s a big fan of Tonči Huljić, which he later confirmed to us.

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The other information we found out wasn’t liked by his better half….

As you can see from the shot of the commercial for JUPOL – Domagoj doesn’t like weddings…. :-)

measuring emotions, neuromarketing, impressions, behavioral marketing, digital marketing

While these are trivial anecdotes, I want to point out to you the fact that a qualitative neuromarketing analysis of a finished ad can show which frames you should use for enhanced marketing communication and which you should avoid if you can’t kick them out of the final version of the ad.

All these tips apply not only to TV commercials but also to all other types of marketing communication – billboards, flyers, social media posts, print ads, packaging….

There are certain risks in carrying out experiments. If you do nothing, nothing bad can happen. It’s hard to hit the sentiment of your audience perfectly with every ad or commercial. But at least no one can blame you for trying something new.

But they can blame you for not checking if you’ve made a mistake and trying to fix it….