Shopping through the eyes of your customer

Dalibor Šumiga Behavioral marketing/Neuromarketing

 social media marketing, brand management, customers, in-store advertising, behavioral marketing, digital marketing

For starters, I’ve got a little experiment for you….

Stand in front of a mirror, look into your own eyes….

Look at your left eye then your right eye and so on several times alternately….

Don’t move your head, just move your eyes – look at your left eye and then your right eye….

social media marketing, brand management, customers, in-store advertising, behavioral marketing, digital marketing

Can you see in your reflection how your eyes move as you shift your gaze from left eye to right and vice versa?

The answer is – NO.

Why? Because you are, between fixations (fixed gazes on one eye), blind….

Eye movement is the fastest movement in the human body and consists of:

01) saccades – rapid eye movements, approximately 3-4 movements per second

02) fixations – a focused view of a specific area of interest for approximately 70 milliseconds

You can see what eye movements of a person studying shelves in a pharmacy look like in this video:

EYE TRACKING – APPLICATION IN SHOPPER MARKETING AND UX TESTING

Whether you want to track customer behavior in your store, a user on your website or in an app, eye tracking is the best tool you want to start your research with.

For websites or applications, your first source of information will be Google Analytics (or application analytics). Although a powerful tool, it will only give you information on what happened, but not why it happened.

Some web shops (and websites) also use tools for so-called “Mouse tracking”, which tracks movements of your courser. That as well isn’t a good strategy.

The correlation between eye movement and mouse movement is between 7 and 20% (depending on whether you’re watching horizontal or vertical movement), which is not enough for a good behavior analysis.

An example of a low correlation of eye and mouse movements can be seen in this short excerpt from a study conducted by Promosapiens.

When we talk about shopper marketing and analyzing customer behavior in a store, eye tracking is the only way to see what your customer sees.

Recently we conducted a survey for a client, where we tested if one shelf in a store can make a significant difference on whether or not we’ll purchase a product. We recruited 60 supermarket customers and measured the percentage of interaction with the shelf (how many respondents take the product in hand) with purchase intent (how many respondents put the product in the cart).

The accuracy of the eye tracking survey on a sample of 60 respondents compared to the actual sales results was 80 %.

F EYE MOVEMENT PATTERN

If you’ve been interested in this topic before, you’ve certainly come across various analyzes that, especially in digital marketing, show an eye movement pattern. The most commonly used is the famous “F form”, i.e. how respondents view Google results in the form of the letter F.

social media marketing, brand management, customers, in-store advertising, behavioral marketing, digital marketing

This data has been taken out of context and generalized to the extent that in a large number of cases it’s completely wrong because there are multiple patterns of eye movement and they depend on the context of the research.

To show you as vividly as possible how eye movement depends on context, I will show you just a small part of the research conducted by Promosapiens replicating the 1960 research. made by Alfred Lukyanovich Yarbus. He is considered a pioneer of visual attention research.

The research uses the painting “Unexpected Visitor” by Ilya Repin. Respondents are told to look at the painting. However, each respondent is given a different task before looking at it.

See how each person’s eye movement differs when given a different task on viewing the same image.

social media marketing, brand management, customers, in-store advertising, behavioral marketing, digital marketing

As you can see from the examples above, customer behavior and their visual attention cannot be easily generalized for all brands, all industries and all occasions. It requires continuous research and optimization of both marketing materials and advertisements and web shops and retail spaces.

Visual attention observed through eye tracking technology is one of the key elements of improving the user experience and we must never forget that one of the first steps in gaining customers is to gain their attention.

The very term “paying attention” tells you that customer attention does not come for free …